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TOPIC: Lessons learnt in the African Bush.

Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 4 weeks ago #3621459

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Much time can be spent on or watching termite nests. According to area, the local ant bear will always dig on the same side - most often, the north-east - which can help in direction finding on a cloudy day. Why specifically a cloudy day? Because if the sun is up direction can be found using a clock face. Point the 12 at the sun, then divide the angle formed by the hour hand and the 12 in half = north.
And termite nests are the home of many animals apart from termites, especially if it has been hollowed out. Owls, porcupine, bat-eared foxes, snakes of many species - all have been found in them. Early morning or just before dark are best times to sit quietly and just watch.
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Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622555

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At the game reserve where I lived, a study was being done on leopards to try and get a breeding programme going. The leopard population has been so hunted that the numbers have seriously decreased, and some areas totally wiped out.
One my own observations when leading a trail past their enclosure was that they always watched the smallest member of the group most.
Leopards are very solitary animals needing large areas to hunt. When walking, either I, or my backstop, were always looking for claw scratch-marks on the trunk of a tree. The leopard would stretch up as high as it could before scratching/marking, thus showing its size, when marking its territory.
To breed, both male and female have to be ready, and, of course, have to meet. As their territories are so large and the boundaries constantly being patrolled, the chances of a meeting at just the right time are slight. On average, it's probably only once in 6 years that mating takes place, and then only a limited number of cubs are born and survive - usually only one or two.
One of their favourite foods is baboon, and their spotted fur blends in well with dappled shade of trees where they watch and wait for prey. We often spotted them in a tree by their tail hanging down - but then we were looking for them and knew what to look for.
Many people have never seen a leopard, and even if it was in sight would overlook it as their blending in with the flora is so perfect.
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Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622558

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Are experiences similar in the South American bush too?

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Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622577

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>> That Kudo's are masters of the highway!
Heavy as a koei and can jump a fence like an antelope.
Never welcomed when landing in the windscreen. A bonnet mascot no one needs! wink.png

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"Out of the Eyes and Words of Children. We 'May', be best Known."

Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622667

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Try an Eland. Just as agile and a full grown male can weigh a ton.
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Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622982

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Probably the most dangerous animal is not the lion nor the elephant - but the hippo. More people have been killed by hippo than by any other animal.
Most folks think that they are just water born balloons, forgetting their size, weight huge jaw and surprising speed. But the biggest danger lies in their unpredictable behaviour.
On one trail at Sabi Sand, we walked past the same pool for six days, sat on the bank overlooking the pool, watching that one and only hippo, with no problems. BUT on the seventh day the big lady took exception to us being there and we had to make a run for it.
Most animals will give a warning if they become "anti" for any reason
That's one of the aspects of animal behavior that trail leaders had to know well - the warning signs. But hippo? Either no warning or it's given under water and out of sight. NEVER, repeat NEVER think that a hippo will not charge. It will. We just don't know when.
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Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622985

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You were very fortunate to have had such a wonderful job Bucky.

I recently watched a program called Judy Denche's passion for trees.
I recommend it for all to watch.
Yes ,for anyone with an inquisitive mind there is much to learn about how intricate each species interacts and supports another.
There is ample proof for anyone who looks beyond their nose that there had to be a designer
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Last edit: by frazzled2.

Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3622986

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As Meerkats. Much used in UK advertising as lovable cuddly creatures. Wrong!
Little known as one of the most fearless and ferocious weight to weight animals in the world.
They don't attack humans unless accidently or otherwise disturbed. But get close and personal. Next stop A&E
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"Out of the Eyes and Words of Children. We 'May', be best Known."
Last edit: by QuinTSensual. Reason: grammar

Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3623004

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Not really a "job" as such - a passion a vocation, yes. My hobby became productive in being to teach others the wonder of creation.
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Lessons learnt in the African Bush. 1 month 3 weeks ago #3623005

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They also carry rabies.

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