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TOPIC: Cat senses

Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2697586

  • Caroline2
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Cat senses are adaptations that allow cats to be highly efficient predators. Cats have acute sight, hearing and smell, and their sense of touch is enhanced by long whiskers that protrude from their heads and bodies. These senses allow cats to hunt effectively in dim light and at night.

Sight: Cats, have a tapetum lucidum, which is a reflective layer behind the retina that sends light that passes through the retina back into the eye. While this improves the ability to see in darkness, it appears to reduce net visual acuity, thus detracting when light is abundant. In very bright light, the slit-like pupil closes very narrowly over the eye, reducing the amount of light on the sensitive retina, and improving depth of field. Big Cats have pupils that contract to a round point. The tapetum and other mechanisms give the cat a minimum light detection threshold up to seven times lower than that of humans. Variation in color of cats' eyes in flash photographs is largely due to the reflection of the flash by the tapetum. Cats struggle to see still water, and will often disrupt the surface with their paws or lick water off their paws. Cats often sleep during the day so they can "hunt" at night. Unlike humans, cats do not need to blink their eyes on a regular basis to keep their eyes lubricated (with tears). Unblinking eyes are probably an advantage when hunting. Cats will, however, "squint" their eyes, usually as a form of communication expressing affection and ease around another cat or human.

Hearing: Humans and cats have a similar range of hearing on the low end of the scale, but cats can hear much higher-pitched sounds, up to 64 kHz, which is 1.6 octaves above the range of a human, and even 1 octave above the range of a dog. When listening for something, a cat's ears will swivel in that direction; a cat's ear flaps (pinnae) can independently point backwards as well as forwards and sideways to pinpoint the source of the sound. Cats can judge within three inches (76 mm) the location of a sound being made one yard (91 cm) away. This can be useful for locating their prey.

Smell: A domestic cat's sense of smell is about fourteen times as strong as humans'. Cats have twice as many receptors in theolfactory epithelium (i.e. smell-sensitive cells in their noses) as people do, meaning that cats have a more acute sense of smell than humans. Cats also have a scent organ in the roof of their mouths called the vomeronasal (or Jacobson's) organ. When a cat wrinkles its muzzle, lowers its chin, and lets its tongue hang a bit, it is opening the passage to the vomeronasal. This is called gaping, "sneering", "snake mouth", or "flehming".
Touch: A cat has about twenty-four movable vibrissae (whiskers), in four sets on each upper lip on either side of its nose (some cats may have more). There are also a few on each cheek, tufts over the eyes, bristles on the chin, the cat's inner "wrists", and at the back of the legs. The Sphynx (a nearly hairless breed) may have full length, short, or no whiskers at all. The structure of the brain region (barrel cortex) which receives information from the vibrissae is similar to that found in the visual cortex which permits the cat to create a three-dimensional map of its surroundings. This doesn't mean that sensing with vibrissae is a type of vision. It is still a touch sensation and environmental information is built up incrementally (in small steps).

Taste: The cat family was shown in 2005 to lack the TAS1R2 protein, one of two required for function of the sweetness sensory receptor. The other protein, TAS1R3, is present and identical to that of other animals, and the relevant taste buds are still present but inactive. Such a genetic marker found in the entire family and not other animals must be the result of a mutation in an early ancestor; as a deletion mutation it could not revert, and thus would be inherited by all descendants, as the evolutionary tree branched out. Some scientists now believe this is the root of the cat family's extremely specialized evolutionary niche as a hunter and carnivore. Their modified sense of taste would cause them to some degree to ignore plants, a large part of whose taste appeal derives from their high sugar content, in favor of a high-protein carnivorous diet, which would still stimulate their remaining taste receptors.












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Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2697594

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I have always found cats to be fascinating creatures.
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Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2697605

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i'll get back to this in a whisker ok!!
The following user(s) said Well Said: Jennet

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Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2697611

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macywack wrote: i'll get back to this in a whisker ok!!


Macy don't be such a tell-Tail you won't be back till after wikey time.
The following user(s) said Well Said: macywack, Jennet

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Sent by carrier pigeon (haven't got a computer)

Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2697621

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I absolutely love cats.

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Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2699220

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JUJO wrote: I absolutely love cats.






I do too, Jujo.

I just had to put down my 20 year old cat.
We found her outside when she was a kitten and took her in.
She was such an affectionate cat. She insisted in sleeping under the covers , right next to my heart.

When I taught piano lessons, she always climbed up on the bench. When their hands were on the piano, she used to put her head under their hands , and voila! They were petting her. At this point she got sent upstairs.

A brother and sister were students, and the sister has a slight allergy. She was ok as long as she didn't touch the cat,. Of course she did, and then her eyes began to water.

When their Dad came to collect them he said, "Honey, I told you not to pet the cat. ". Then her brother said, "But Dad, she makes you pet her" :laugh:

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Cat senses 2 years 6 months ago #2699730

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Jennet wrote:

JUJO wrote: I absolutely love cats.






I do too, Jujo.

I just had to put down my 20 year old cat.
We found her outside when she was a kitten and took her in.
She was such an affectionate cat. She insisted in sleeping under the covers , right next to my heart.

When I taught piano lessons, she always climbed up on the bench. When their hands were on the piano, she used to put her head under their hands , and voila! They were petting her. At this point she got sent upstairs.

A brother and sister were students, and the sister has a slight allergy. She was ok as long as she didn't touch the cat,. Of course she did, and then her eyes began to water.

When their Dad came to collect them he said, "Honey, I told you not to pet the cat. ". Then her brother said, "But Dad, she makes you pet her" :laugh:










Oh Jennet,
Just want to say,so very sorry to hear that you had to have your 20 year old cat put to sleep. Wonderful age for a cat,I have never had a cat that has reached that age.

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Cat senses 2 years 5 months ago #2721708

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Caroline2 wrote: Cat senses are adaptations that allow cats to be highly efficient predators. Cats have acute sight, hearing and smell, and their sense of touch is enhanced by long whiskers that protrude from their heads and bodies. These senses allow cats to hunt effectively in dim light and at night.

Sight: Cats, have a tapetum lucidum, which is a reflective layer behind the retina that sends light that passes through the retina back into the eye. While this improves the ability to see in darkness, it appears to reduce net visual acuity, thus detracting when light is abundant. In very bright light, the slit-like pupil closes very narrowly over the eye, reducing the amount of light on the sensitive retina, and improving depth of field. Big Cats have pupils that contract to a round point. The tapetum and other mechanisms give the cat a minimum light detection threshold up to seven times lower than that of humans. Variation in color of cats' eyes in flash photographs is largely due to the reflection of the flash by the tapetum. Cats struggle to see still water, and will often disrupt the surface with their paws or lick water off their paws. Cats often sleep during the day so they can "hunt" at night. Unlike humans, cats do not need to blink their eyes on a regular basis to keep their eyes lubricated (with tears). Unblinking eyes are probably an advantage when hunting. Cats will, however, "squint" their eyes, usually as a form of communication expressing affection and ease around another cat or human.

Hearing: Humans and cats have a similar range of hearing on the low end of the scale, but cats can hear much higher-pitched sounds, up to 64 kHz, which is 1.6 octaves above the range of a human, and even 1 octave above the range of a dog. When listening for something, a cat's ears will swivel in that direction; a cat's ear flaps (pinnae) can independently point backwards as well as forwards and sideways to pinpoint the source of the sound. Cats can judge within three inches (76 mm) the location of a sound being made one yard (91 cm) away. This can be useful for locating their prey.

Smell: A domestic cat's sense of smell is about fourteen times as strong as humans'. Cats have twice as many receptors in theolfactory epithelium (i.e. smell-sensitive cells in their noses) as people do, meaning that cats have a more acute sense of smell than humans. Cats also have a scent organ in the roof of their mouths called the vomeronasal (or Jacobson's) organ. When a cat wrinkles its muzzle, lowers its chin, and lets its tongue hang a bit, it is opening the passage to the vomeronasal. This is called gaping, "sneering", "snake mouth", or "flehming".
Touch: A cat has about twenty-four movable vibrissae (whiskers), in four sets on each upper lip on either side of its nose (some cats may have more). There are also a few on each cheek, tufts over the eyes, bristles on the chin, the cat's inner "wrists", and at the back of the legs. The Sphynx (a nearly hairless breed) may have full length, short, or no whiskers at all. The structure of the brain region (barrel cortex) which receives information from the vibrissae is similar to that found in the visual cortex which permits the cat to create a three-dimensional map of its surroundings. This doesn't mean that sensing with vibrissae is a type of vision. It is still a touch sensation and environmental information is built up incrementally (in small steps).

Taste: The cat family was shown in 2005 to lack the TAS1R2 protein, one of two required for function of the sweetness sensory receptor. The other protein, TAS1R3, is present and identical to that of other animals, and the relevant taste buds are still present but inactive. Such a genetic marker found in the entire family and not other animals must be the result of a mutation in an early ancestor; as a deletion mutation it could not revert, and thus would be inherited by all descendants, as the evolutionary tree branched out. Some scientists now believe this is the root of the cat family's extremely specialized evolutionary niche as a hunter and carnivore. Their modified sense of taste would cause them to some degree to ignore plants, a large part of whose taste appeal derives from their high sugar content, in favor of a high-protein carnivorous diet, which would still stimulate their remaining taste receptors.






















Very true, about cats eyesight,cats can and do see things that are barely visible to the human eye. My own cat,can see things I can't.

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Cat senses 2 years 5 months ago #2722192

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JUJO wrote:

Caroline2 wrote: Cat senses are adaptations that allow cats to be highly efficient predators. Cats have acute sight, hearing and smell, and their sense of touch is enhanced by long whiskers that protrude from their heads and bodies. These senses allow cats to hunt effectively in dim light and at night.

Sight: Cats, have a tapetum lucidum, which is a reflective layer behind the retina that sends light that passes through the retina back into the eye. While this improves the ability to see in darkness, it appears to reduce net visual acuity, thus detracting when light is abundant. In very bright light, the slit-like pupil closes very narrowly over the eye, reducing the amount of light on the sensitive retina, and improving depth of field. Big Cats have pupils that contract to a round point. The tapetum and other mechanisms give the cat a minimum light detection threshold up to seven times lower than that of humans. Variation in color of cats' eyes in flash photographs is largely due to the reflection of the flash by the tapetum. Cats struggle to see still water, and will often disrupt the surface with their paws or lick water off their paws. Cats often sleep during the day so they can "hunt" at night. Unlike humans, cats do not need to blink their eyes on a regular basis to keep their eyes lubricated (with tears). Unblinking eyes are probably an advantage when hunting. Cats will, however, "squint" their eyes, usually as a form of communication expressing affection and ease around another cat or human.

Hearing: Humans and cats have a similar range of hearing on the low end of the scale, but cats can hear much higher-pitched sounds, up to 64 kHz, which is 1.6 octaves above the range of a human, and even 1 octave above the range of a dog. When listening for something, a cat's ears will swivel in that direction; a cat's ear flaps (pinnae) can independently point backwards as well as forwards and sideways to pinpoint the source of the sound. Cats can judge within three inches (76 mm) the location of a sound being made one yard (91 cm) away. This can be useful for locating their prey.

Smell: A domestic cat's sense of smell is about fourteen times as strong as humans'. Cats have twice as many receptors in theolfactory epithelium (i.e. smell-sensitive cells in their noses) as people do, meaning that cats have a more acute sense of smell than humans. Cats also have a scent organ in the roof of their mouths called the vomeronasal (or Jacobson's) organ. When a cat wrinkles its muzzle, lowers its chin, and lets its tongue hang a bit, it is opening the passage to the vomeronasal. This is called gaping, "sneering", "snake mouth", or "flehming".
Touch: A cat has about twenty-four movable vibrissae (whiskers), in four sets on each upper lip on either side of its nose (some cats may have more). There are also a few on each cheek, tufts over the eyes, bristles on the chin, the cat's inner "wrists", and at the back of the legs. The Sphynx (a nearly hairless breed) may have full length, short, or no whiskers at all. The structure of the brain region (barrel cortex) which receives information from the vibrissae is similar to that found in the visual cortex which permits the cat to create a three-dimensional map of its surroundings. This doesn't mean that sensing with vibrissae is a type of vision. It is still a touch sensation and environmental information is built up incrementally (in small steps).

Taste: The cat family was shown in 2005 to lack the TAS1R2 protein, one of two required for function of the sweetness sensory receptor. The other protein, TAS1R3, is present and identical to that of other animals, and the relevant taste buds are still present but inactive. Such a genetic marker found in the entire family and not other animals must be the result of a mutation in an early ancestor; as a deletion mutation it could not revert, and thus would be inherited by all descendants, as the evolutionary tree branched out. Some scientists now believe this is the root of the cat family's extremely specialized evolutionary niche as a hunter and carnivore. Their modified sense of taste would cause them to some degree to ignore plants, a large part of whose taste appeal derives from their high sugar content, in favor of a high-protein carnivorous diet, which would still stimulate their remaining taste receptors.






















Very true, about cats eyesight,cats can and do see things that are barely visible to the human eye. My own cat,can see things I can't.




that explains it!!! :laugh:

I have been saying, "get your treat kitty. My gosh, it's right in front of you!"

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Cat senses 2 years 5 months ago #2722386

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Such beautiful mysterious animals, cats are, they bring us so much love,affection,

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